• Lisbon to Southampton Cruise: 11 - nights
Silver Muse
    • Twin Cabin from
    • $9,050
    • per person view
    • Single Cabin from
    • $18,100
    • per person view

Set sail from Lisbon on your 11-night cruise to Southampton. This itinerary visits Oporto, La Coruna, Gijon, Bilbao, Bordeaux, Belle Ile, St Peter Port, Saint Malo, Honfleur and Southampton.

Sailing Dates
Departs: Thu, Aug 31 2017
Arrives: Mon, Sep 11 2017
Cruise code: 6716
Package Includes
  • Spacious suites – over 85% with private verandas
  • Personalised service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Butler service in every suite – all guests are pampered equally
  • Open-seating dining options – dine when and with whomever you please
  • Diversity of dining venues – casual, romantic, regional delicacies, and gourmet cuisine inspired by Relais & Châteaux
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship – select wines, premium spirits, specialty coffees and soft drinks, plus your own tailored mini-bar
  • In-suite dining and 24-hour room service – always complimentary, always available
  • Sophisticated entertainment from live music to production shows
  • Enrichment lecturer and/or destination consultant
  • Complimentary transportation into town in most ports
  • Gratuities always included in your fare
  • Free WiFi throughout the ship; unlimited in select suite categories
+ show more
Bonus Offer!
  • All Inclusive Cruising: Complimentary Beverages Including Mini-Bars; Gratuities; Fine Dining; Complimentary WiFi plus More

Set sail from Lisbon on your 11-night cruise to Southampton. This itinerary visits Oporto, La Coruna, Gijon, Bilbao, Bordeaux, Belle Ile, St Peter Port, Saint Malo, Honfleur and Southampton.

Sailing Dates
Departs: Thu, Aug 31 2017
Arrives: Mon, Sep 11 2017
Cruise code: 6716
Inclusions
  • Spacious suites – over 85% with private verandas
  • Personalised service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Butler service in every suite – all guests are pampered equally
  • Open-seating dining options – dine when and with whomever you please
  • Diversity of dining venues – casual, romantic, regional delicacies, and gourmet cuisine inspired by Relais & Châteaux
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship – select wines, premium spirits, specialty coffees and soft drinks, plus your own tailored mini-bar
  • In-suite dining and 24-hour room service – always complimentary, always available
  • Sophisticated entertainment from live music to production shows
  • Enrichment lecturer and/or destination consultant
  • Complimentary transportation into town in most ports
  • Gratuities always included in your fare
  • Free WiFi throughout the ship; unlimited in select suite categories
+ show more
Bonus Offer!
  • All Inclusive Cruising: Complimentary Beverages Including Mini-Bars; Gratuities; Fine Dining; Complimentary WiFi plus More
Select further info:
1
Lisbon - Depart: Thu, Aug 31, 2017 @ 17:00
2
Leixoes (Porto) - Arrive: Fri, Sep 1, 2017 @ 08:00
Depart: Fri, Sep 1, 2017 @ 16:00
3
La Coruna - Arrive: Sat, Sep 2, 2017 @ 08:00
Depart: Sat, Sep 2, 2017 @ 19:00
4
Gijon - Arrive: Sun, Sep 3, 2017 @ 08:00
Depart: Sun, Sep 3, 2017 @ 19:00
5
Bilbao - Arrive: Mon, Sep 4, 2017 @ 07:00
Depart: Mon, Sep 4, 2017 @ 17:00
6
Bordeaux - Arrive: Tue, Sep 5, 2017 @ 08:30
Depart: Tue, Sep 5, 2017 @ 00:00
7
Bordeaux - Arrive: Wed, Sep 6, 2017 @ 00:00
Depart: Wed, Sep 6, 2017 @ 19:15
8
Belle Ile - Arrive: Thu, Sep 7, 2017 @ 10:00
Depart: Thu, Sep 7, 2017 @ 17:00
9
St.Malo - Arrive: Fri, Sep 8, 2017 @ 14:00
Depart: Fri, Sep 8, 2017 @ 00:00
10
St.Malo - Arrive: Sat, Sep 9, 2017 @ 00:00
Depart: Sat, Sep 9, 2017 @ 19:15
11
Honfleur - Arrive: Sun, Sep 10, 2017 @ 08:00
Depart: Sun, Sep 10, 2017 @ 17:30
12
Southampton - Arrive: Mon, Sep 11, 2017 @ 07:00
 
Total length of cruise: 11 - nights

Lisbon - Spread over a string of seven hills north of the Rio Tejo (Tagus River) estuary, Lisbon presents an intriguing variety of faces to those who negotiate its switchback streets. In the oldest neighborhoods, stepped alleys whose street pattern dates back to Moorish times are lined with pastel-color houses decked with laundry; here and there, miradouros (vantage points) afford spectacular river or city views. In the grand 18th-century center, calçada à portuguesa (black-and-white mosaic cobblestone) sidewalks border wide boulevards. Elétricos (trams) clank through the streets, and blue-and-white azulejos (painted and glazed ceramic tiles) adorn churches, restaurants, and fountains

Oporto - Lively, commercial Oporto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon. Also called Porto for short, the word easily brings to mind the city's most famous product - port wine. Oporto's strategic location on the north bank of the Douro River has accounted for the town's importance since ancient times. The Romans built a fort here where their trading route crossed the Douro, and the Moors brought their own culture to the area. Oporto profited from provisioning crusaders en route to the Holy Land and enjoyed the riches from Portuguese maritime discoveries during the 15th and 16th centuries

La Coruna - La Coruña, the largest city in Spain's Galicia region, is among the country's busiest ports. The remote Galicia area is tucked into the northwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula, surprising visitors with its green and misty countryside that is so much unlike other parts of Spain. The name "Galicia" is Celtic in origin, for it was the Celts who occupied the region around the 6th-century BC and erected fortifications. La Coruña was already considered an important port under the Romans. They were followed by an invasion of Suevians, Visigoths and, much later in 730, the Moors. It was after Galicia was incorporated into the Kingdom of Asturias that the epic saga of the Pilgrimage to Santiago (St. James) began

Gijon- The Campo Valdés baths, dating back to the 1st century AD, and other reminders of Gijón's time as an ancient Roman port remain visible downtown. Gijón was almost destroyed in a 14th-century struggle over the Castilian throne, but by the 19th century it was a thriving port and industrial city. The modern-day city is part fishing port, part summer resort, and part university town, packed with cafés, restaurants, and sidrerías.

Bilbao - Time in Bilbao (Bilbo, in Euskera) may be recorded as BG or AG (Before Guggenheim or After Guggenheim). Never has a single monument of art and architecture so radically changed a city. Frank Gehry's stunning museum, Norman Foster's sleek subway system, the Santiago Calatrava glass footbridge and airport, the leafy César Pelli Abandoibarra park and commercial complex next to the Guggenheim, and the Philippe Starck Alhóndiga Bilbao cultural center have contributed to an unprecedented cultural revolution in what was once the industry capital of the Basque Country.Greater Bilbao encompasses almost 1 million inhabitants, nearly half the total population of the Basque Country

Bordeaux - Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what ou'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why, when he was exiled from his native Spain, the painter Francisco de Goya chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years)

Belle Ile - Lovely Belle-Île-en-Mer is the largest of a small clutch of islands off the coast of Brittany. Just twelve miles long and less than four miles wide, this verdant atoll benefits from a mild climate, which contributes to the abundant flora found here. Fragrant eucalyptus, exotic gingko and mimosa trees, bountiful figs and colourful oleanders are all part of the lush landscape. Secluded, small beaches along coastal paths and quiet roadways are perfect for hiking and biking. Le Palais, the island’s main town, boasts a 16th-century citadel standing guard near the harbour. Monet painted the charming village of Sauzon during a stay in 1886 and Sarah Bernhart owned a home on the island for several years

St Peter Port - Twenty-five square mile (40 sq km) Guernsey is the second largest of the Channel Islands, which lie in the English Channel west of the Cherbourg peninsula. Along with its sister island of Jersey, Guernsey has been a part of Britain since 1066, though retaining a culture entirely of its own. The Channel Islands were the only British territory that experienced foreign occupation during World War II. German forces invaded in 1940 and occupied the islands for five years. Massive concrete fortifications, built with forced labour, can still be seen in several places. They never came into use, but were simply bypassed by the Normandy landings

Saint Malo - Thrust out into the sea, bound to the mainland only by man-made causeways, romantic St-Malo-"the pirates' city" has built a reputation as a breeding ground for phenomenal sailors. Many were fishermen, but St-Malo's most famous sea dogs were corsairs, pirates paid by the French crown to harass the Limeys across the Channel. The views here are stupendous, especially at high tide. A weeklong fire in 1944, kindled by retreating Nazis, wiped out nearly all the old buildings in St-Malo

Honfleur - Beloved by artists, Honfleur is the most picturesque of the Côte Fleurie's little seaside towns. Much of the city's Renaissance architecture remains intact, especially around the 17th-century Vieux Bassin harbor, which is almost as supremely colorful as in the days when the great Impressionist masters often painted it. The town has become increasingly crowded since the opening of the elegant Pont de Normandie, providing a direct link with Le Havre and Upper Normandy—the world's largest cable-stayed bridge, it's supported by two concrete pylons taller than the Eiffel Tower and is designed to resist winds of 160 mph

Southampton - Southampton is England's leading passenger port, and as the home port of Henry V's fleet bound for Agincourt, the Mayflower, the Queen Mary, and the ill-fated Titanic, along with countless other great ocean liners of the 20th century, the city has one of the richest maritime traditions in England. Parts of the center can seem shoddy, having been hastily rebuilt after World War II bombing, but bits of the city's history peek out from between modern buildings. The Old Town retains its medieval feel, and considerable parts of Southampton's castellated town walls remain. Other attractions include a decent art gallery, extensive parks, and a couple of good museums

  • Select
  • Selected Configuration
No credit card is needed to hold a cabin for up to 5 days
Need a Group Booking of 5 or more cabins?
Cabin Name:
Deck:
Triple Cabin
n/a
Quad Cabin
n/a

Please note: All prices featured are per person AUD (unless otherwise stated), and include non commission fares (taxes, fees and port expenses). Prices and availability are subject to change due to changes made by the Cruise Companies. Prices quoted are based on payments made via BPAY or bank transfer. Visa and Mastercard credit card payments incur a 1.2% transaction fee, 0.5% for debit cards and 2.8% for American Express.

The best deals from: